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Lesson Plan with Fables and Worksheets

Fables with Dolch Sight Words || Free Fables to Copy

Materials Needed:

A Funny Dolch Word Book #2 (with all of the second grade words)
Amazon.com, Discounted 30% at PayPal or with a check or purchase order. See excerpts.

A Funny Dolch Word Book #3 (with all of the third grade words)
Amazon.com, Discounted 30% at PayPal or with a check or purchase order. See excerpts.

Worksheets #1 and #2 (Scoll down for them.)

cover of Dolch book #3
cover of Dolch book #2

Age group: This can be adapted for all school ages. Discussion of the psychology presented in the fables can range from classroom and family issues to world issues depending on the ages and interests of the students. Discuss real life examples of how the morals can be helpful. Point out the fact that these fables have lasted for centuries because they teach important truths.

Purpose: Especially for children, stories are compatible means of teaching important truths. We have gotten many familiar expressions from fables, e. g. the wolf in sheep's clothing; who will bell the cat(?); he that is neither one thing nor the other has no friends; you can't please everyone; sour grapes rationalization; any excuse will serve a tyrant (a bully or other abusive person); work together for the common good; treat others the way you would like to be treated; if we hurt others, we hurt ourselves in the process; don't make a mountain out of a molehill; it can be better to share than to fight; one good turn deserves another. Let's remember that fables were originally aimed at adults.

Instructions: Have children rewrite, retell, or even act out fables. Ask them to write or tell the fables in their own words. Let them feel free to rephrase the moral as long as they understand the main idea.

Worksheet #1: Sheet to Copy for Writing Fables

Use this worksheet for fables in A Funny Dolch Word Book #2,   A Funny Dolch Word Book #3, or other books. This worksheet does not have a fable on it. Many lines for writing are below the heading.
From: (name of book) _________________________________________
Title of the Fable: ______________________________________
A (An) ________________Fable as Told by _______________________
Ask them to put Aesop's, Native American, Irish, etc. to describe the type of fable as told by (the student's name). This is a good opportunity to teach about literary honesty. Even if a story is in the public domain, credit should be given to the original individual or group who created it.

See Fables with Dolch Sight Words for a quick review of the titles and morals in A Funny Dolch Word Book #2, and A Funny Dolch Word Book #3.

Worksheet #2: Free Fables
Free fables are presented with guidelines for re-writing these or for writing other fables.


Fables in A Funny Dolch Word Book #2 and A Funny Dolch Word Book #3

Aesop's fables in these two books mostly have words which are on the Dolch word list. To remain true to the fables, non-Dolch list words are used occassionally. The morals are stated in simple terms. In many books of fables, the morals were often rephrased, but the stories remained basically the same.

cover of Dolch book #2 Morals from the Fables in

A Funny Dolch Word Book #2

See an excerpt. This book has all of the grade 2 words.

A little at a time can get a big job done. So we should start work on a big job right away.
(from "The Crow and the Pitcher")

Treat others the way you would like to be treated if you were them.
(from "The Fox and the Stork")

It is best to do today's work today. Don't wait till later.
(from "The Ant and the Grasshopper")

When we try to hurt others, we hurt ourselves.
(from "The Frog and the Mouse")

When we want someone to do something, it is best to make them glad to do it.
(from "The Wind and the Sun")

To stay out of trouble, don't make the same mistakes others make.
(from "The Old Lion and the Fox")

Others are not always as lucky as they seem. We need to be thankful for what we have.
(from "The Peacock's Complaint")

Getting mad over little things can make it worse.
(from "The Bear and the Bees")

We try to help someone who has helped us.
(from "The Lion and the Mouse")

This book has other character building stories which don't state a moral.
See an excerpt from A Funny Dolch Word Book #2.

cover of Dolch book #3 Morals from the Fables in

A Funny Dolch Word Book #3

See an excerpt. This book has all of the grade 3 words.

We should show that we are grateful to those who help us.
(from "The Ant and the Dove")

We cannot please everyone. So we must do what we know is the right thing to do.
(from "The Man, the Boy, and the Donkey")

Be careful because some people cannot be trusted.
(from "The Fox and the Goat")

It can be better to share than to fight.
(from "The Donkey's Shadow")

If someone tells lies, it is hard to believe them even when they tell the truth.
(from "The Shepherd's Boy")

We should not have fun by hurting others.
(from "The Boys and the Frogs")

When someone wants to be bad, they always try to find ways to blame others. How they act is not our fault.
(from "The Wolf and the Lamb")

This book has other character building stories which don't state a moral.
See an excerpt from A Funny Dolch Word Book #3.


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