From Little Lemon: Activities for Developing Motivation and Memory Skills by Betsy B. Lee, Learning Abilities Books, http://www.gate.net/~labooks This lesson plan may be reproduced for classroom use only. All other rights are reserved. (Lesson plan Copyright 1997 Betsy B. Lee) Return to Lesson Plans or Catalog from Learning Abilities Books.
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LESSON PLAN
Digit Reversal Correction: 6 Doesn't Mix

Materials: Pencils with erasers, paper, chalkboard for demonstration

     Remembering by association is a successful memory strategy. Children can use the curve and direction of the right hand as a memory cue to self-correct digit reversals.
     Pictures and the concepts in this lesson plan are adapted from: "Hand checking and six doesn't mix: Remediation of digit reversals" by Madge M. Connor, 1980, Academic Therapy, 16, pp. 207-210. Copyright (1980) by PRO-ED, Inc. Published on this web site with written permission from PRO-ED.

Method:

  1. Initially, children should make large numbers which makes checking easier.
  2. Work with one child at a time or use small groups.
  3. Work only with left-handed children or only with right-handed children.
  4. Don't use the words, left-hand or right-hand. Following this lesson plan, left-handed and right-handed children will hold their pencils in the left hand while checking with the right hand without your needing to use the words, left hand or right hand.
  5. If a child is not clearly right-handed or left-handed, a small mark or sticker can be placed on the right hand as a reminder about which hand to use for checking.
  6. For this lesson, refer to the pictures on page two (scroll down).
Procedure for right-handed children:
  1. To the group of right-handed children say, "Sometimes, you have trouble remembering which way to write numbers. The number, one, is no problem. Let's start with two. Watch me."
  2. Write the number two on the board. With the chalk in your left hand, show hand checking by making your right hand curve in the same direction as the curve of the number.
  3. Say, "Look. The curved part of the number points the same way as my fingers. This is a good way to remember which way some of the numbers go. You link what you need to learn to something you already know. You already know which way the fingers of this hand curve. You need to learn which way the numbers go. Link the curve and direction of the fingers on this hand to the curve and direction of the number two."
  4. Tell them, "Write a big 2 on your paper. Put your pencil in your other hand. Check with your free hand to see if the curve and direction of your fingers fit the number."
  5. Be sure they understand the concept. Let them practice. Preferably, wait till another day to use these steps for 3, 5, 7, 9. For the number 6, say that 6 doesn't mix. Its curve goes the other way.
Procedure for left-handed children:

     Use the same procedure.
     Say, "Write a big number 2 on your paper. Keep holding your pencil. Check with your free hand to see if the curve and direction of your fingers fit the number 2."


Scroll down for illustrations.


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Page 2

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LESSON PLAN:  DIGIT REVERSAL CORRECTION LINKS  (Memory Skill Instruction)
hands showing directions of
 numbers
     Pictures are from "Hand checking and six doesn't mix: remediation of digit reversals" by Madge M. Connor, 1980, Academic Therapy, 16, pp. 207-210. Copyright (1980) by PRO-ED, Inc. Published on this web site with written permission from PRO-ED.
     Her article is the basis of this lesson plan which is among others in the book, Little Lemon: Activities for Developing Motivation and Memory Skills by Betsy B. Lee, Learning Abilities Books, http://www.gate.net/~labooks This lesson plan may be reproduced for classroom use only. All other rights are reserved. Return to Lesson Plans from Learning Abilities Books.